HORÁRIO VISITA: Terça a domingo das 10h às 18h

With what Voice

The search for a synthesis

The first album of Amália was edited in Brazil in 1945, counting with two themes: “Perseguição” and “As Penas”. The phase we call “continental” was prolonged until 1950, and the albums had mostly classic fados. Maybe because of that, and due to her love for the Spanish language and culture, she started a path through the music from there. Amália recorded, for the publisher Continental, titles such as those mentioned above, besides “Tendinha”, “Sei Finalmente”, “Fado do Ciúme”, “Mouraria”, “Passei Por Você”, “Duas Luzes”, “Troca de Olhares”, “Sardinheiras”. However, Amália also interpreted “Ojos Verdes”, “Carmencita”, “Los Piconeros”. Early on, Amália revealed this ardent passion for the Spanish culture, language, and songs.

Disc

Disc

Disc

In 1951, Amália began to record with the publisher Melodia, editing, therefore, her albums in Portugal. She continued the tour through the most classical fados, recording titles like “Fado Malhoa”, “Fado do Ciúme” or even “Não Sei Porque Te Foste Embora”. In this phase, which lasted until 1953, Amália subtly started her itinerary through Portuguese poetry, interpreting for the first time a poem by Pedro Homem de Mello, entitled “Fria Claridade”.



In 1952, Amália goes to London, to the Abbey Road studio, to record themes like “La Salvaora”, “Noite de Santo António”, “Malmequer Pequenino”, “Grão de Arroz”, “Lereré”, “Não Digas Mal Dele”, “Zarzamora”, “Uma Casa Portuguesa”, “Tudo Isto É Fado”, “Fado Hilário”, “El Negro Zumbón”, and others. It is also in this time that Amália records “Foi Deus” by Alberto Janes. And, also, a fado with verses by David Mourão-Ferreira, who would become one of the greatest poets of Amália’s career. In this way, it was recorded the fado “Primavera”, with composition by Pedro Rodrigues.

Disc Cover

Disc Cover



To these themes, recorded in successive 78-rotation albums, would follow titles like “Barco Negro”, “Fallaste Corázon”, “Trepa no Coqueiro”, “Solidão”, “Antigamente”, “Por Un Amor”. The first album of this series comes as a little collection of what Amália sang both in Portuguese and Spanish. This album with title in English (Amália Sings Fado From Portugal and Flamenco From Spain) appears as a perfect example of the “Amália-interpret” of fado and flamenco.

These albums (LP) are also released in France, the USA, England, South Africa. Amália à l’Olympia is the one of this series that seems to have the greater success. It is a result of the recording of a live concert that Amália gave in that showroom (Olympia) in the year 1956. It was published in France, Japan, Holland, Italy, South Africa, and Portugal.

About Barclays (publisher), we know that it was released an album of Amália, in France, in 1956, entitled Les Meilleurs Fados Portugais. The publisher Festival also edited an album with the title Fados, and Duceretet Thomson was responsible for the edition of another compilation of fados, as other publishing companies released too.

Disc Cover

Disc Cover

 

Then, it followed the 45-speed albums, edited by Columbia. The titles Amália The Beautiful, Les Amants du Tage, Amália Sings, Fado dos Fados were being published, as were others without a title – only with the name and image of Amália. That alone was enough to sell, it was not even necessary to add a title to the albums themselves. In 1958, came out an album of Amália singing only in French, with the title Chante En Français. In the same way, it was released an album recorded only with themes from Sangue Toureiro (Les Airs du Film Sangue Toureiro), and an album with a compilation of Spanish themes (Chante En Espagnol).

The publisher Alvorada edited some more albums in Portugal, and some of them also in Mozambique. These constituted a great entrance door to the 60s. In end of the 50s and early 60s, Amália would edit more themes by Alberto Janes, like “Rosas do Meu Caminho”, “Fadista Louco”, and by Pedro Homem de Mello, like “Quando os Outros Te Batem Beijo-te Eu”, besides more popular themes as “Bailaricos” and “O Namorico da Rita”. “Conta Errada”, “Campinos do Ribatejo”, “Eu disse adeus à Casinha” are also edited.

Amália edits, with Duceretet Thomson, Au Pays du Fado, which comes out in France in 1966 as an album recorded live at Bobino in 1960. This album is also published in Portugal and in Holland. Alvorada, in Portugal, gives us too some records of Amália: the first of them without title and date specified, and another one, released in 1962, entitled Fado e Touros. Of these two albums, the edition of “Cansaço” stands out, with verses by Luís de Macedo. Again, in France, by Festival (publisher), an audacious album for that time (1962) is released, with the title Fado e Guitarradas Au Portugal.

In 1962, a truly innovative album, that would change forever the History of fado, is published. In the album Busto, Amália interpreted titles like “Estranha Forma de Vida”, poem written by herself, “Abandono” by David Mourão-Ferreira, “Povo Que Lavas No Rio” by Pedro Homem de Mello. The first edition of this record is released in the United Kingdom, and then, in France, South Africa, Japan. After this one, some other important albums are released, such as Amália For Your Delight, Fado Português, Chante Le Portugal, and Vou Dar de Beber à Dor, the best seller in Portugal.

Disc Cover

Disc Cover

Disc Cover

 

In 1965, a record that would get some academics in the country (Portugal) annoyed had already been released. We are referring to the 45-speed album Amália Canta Luís de Camões, in which Amália records “Lianor”, “Dura Memória” and “Erros Meus” (poems by Luís de Camões) – all of them with music by Alain Oulman.

The “Marchas de Lisboa” also have a place in Amália’s discography, having the right to being reunited in a single album. In 1968, it is edited by Columbia (Valentim de Carvalho) the album Marchas Populares, where she sang accompanied by the orchestra directed by Ferrer Trindade, Jorge Costa Pinto and Joaquim Luís Gomes.

In the United States, it was released a record with a title that confirmed the already patent idea, Amália The Soul Of Portugal. In the end of the 60s, we must still mention themes like “Fandangueiro”, “Fado do Ciúme”, “Le Premier Jour Du Monde”, “Inch’Allah”, “Júlia Florista”, “La Maison Sur Le Port”, and “Ai Chico, Chico”.

In 1968, Amália Canta Poesia Portuguesa Medieval is published.

Disc Cover

Disc Cover

Disc Cover

 

It is in the early 70s that the best compilation of Portuguese poetry sang by the voice of Amália, in terms of author variety, is published – the album Com Que Voz. In that sense, Amália edits titles as “Trova do Vento que Passa” by Manuel Alegre, “As Mãos Que Trago” by Cecília Meireles, “Gaivota” by Alexandre O’Neill, “Com Que Voz” by Luís de Camões, among others.

Additionally, the concert Amália gave in Japan, in the Shakein Hall, and in Italy is edited, also coming out two important testimonials of the evenings passed in Amália’s house.

Disc Cover

Disc Cover



The first of those testimonials came out, by the publisher Decca, in 1970 and was entitled Amália/Vinicius. This one was recorded in Amália’s house on December 19th of 1968, and counted with Vinicius de Moraes, Natália Correia, Ary dos Santos, David Mourão-Ferreira, the guitarist Fontes Rocha and the fado guitarist Pedro Leal. After this, in 1971, it was also released Cantigas de Amigos (the second testimonial mentioned), again with the presence of Ary dos Santos and Natália Correia. This album represents a little sample of this king of medieval Galician-Portuguese through Natália Correia’s adaptations.

Disc Cover

Disc Cover

Disc Cover

More records of live shows are released, among them Em Paris (France), No Canecão (Brazil), No Café Luso (Portugal; recorded in 1955), Amália in Teatro (concert in Italy), Em Joanesburgo (South Africa). About Italy, Amália also edited a remarkable album, A Una Terra Che Amo. In this one, we can listen to interpretations of “Ciuri Ciuri”, “Sora Menina”, “La Tarantella”, “Vitti na Crozza”, and others.

Still, the album Fandangueiro represented an important reference to the Portuguese popular music heritage, besides the album Amália Canta Portugal that is a memorial to the Portuguese folklore, throughout three albums. The first one was recorded in 1966, with the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, precisely when Amália goes on stage at Lincoln Center and Hollywood Bowl, giving voice to this immaterial heritage that has its roots in the Portuguese culture.

 

Another innovative album for fado is Amália & Don Byas, dated from 1973, by the publisher Columbia. In this sound document, Amália accompanies Don Byas, the tenor saxophone, with her sublime voice, with an improvised singing counter. In this album, some of the great successes of Amália’s career until then are edited, such as “Coimbra”, “Libertação”, “Estranha Forma de Vida”, and others.

Still in the 70s, compilations with her best themes are released. In Spain, Amália appears in Así Canta, being the nr. 97, and it is edited the album Amália by the publisher Ódeon. In Italy, Amália is included in the series I Maestri; in Holland, comes out an album with the title Les Plus Grands Succès; in Japan it is published an album called Barco Negro – Amália Rodrigues Best 20.

Disc Cover 2019

In the 80s, Amália records her own poems in two records: Gostava de Ser Quem Era and Lágrima. Composed by Fontes Rocha and Carlos Gonçalves, Amália edits “Lavava no Rio Lavava”, “Morrinha”, “O Fado Chora-se Bem”, “Grito”, “Os Teus Olhos São Duas Fontes”, “Gostava de Ser Quem Era”, among others.

Also, in the 80s, Amália records two very happy themes by Carlos Paião (Portuguese singer and songwriter): “O Senhor Extraterrestre” and “Amigo Brasileiro”. Both are put in a 1982 album entitled O Senhor Extraterrestre. Later, it is released an album with themes in English entitled Amália na Broadway, where Amália interprets successes like “Who Will Buy”, “Summertime”, “The Nearness of You”, among others. This record is also published in Portugal, and in France and Japan.

Disc Cover

Disc Cover

Disc Cover

Disc Cover




In 1990, the album Obsessão is edited, the last one recorded in life. After that, the compilations of The Best Of Amália are released, trying to gather the best that Amália sang – a job almost impossible, among a vast repertoire, the one to choose which were the best themes recorded by the Queen of Fado.


INFORMATION TAKEN FROM THE WORK AMÁLIA, UMA BIOGRAFIA BY VÍTOR PAVÃO DOS SANTOS AND THE CATALOGUE AMÁLIA: CORAÇÃO INDEPENDENTE, 2009.